PIKES  PEAK  GRANITE

 

One of the most visited mountain peaks in the American Cordillera is central Colorado's Pikes Peak (it is supposed to be spelled “Pike’s Peak”, but it is deliberately misspelled "Pikes Peak").  The rocks of this mountain & surrounding area represent the Pikes Peak Batholith, a fairly large, late Mesoproterozoic-aged igneous intrusion that was emplaced 1.08 billion years ago.  Published research on the Pikes Peak Batholith has shown that several igneous facies are present (e.g., Hutchinson, 1987).

 


 

Pikes Peak (looking W from between Colorado Springs and Manitou Springs).  All of the pinkish-red rocks are granites of the Pikes Peak Batholith (1.08 b.y.).

 


 

Eastern side of summit of Pikes Peak (looking ~SSW) & granites of the Pikes Peak Batholith (1.08 b.y.).

 


 

View from Pikes Peak summit (looking ~E toward the Great Plains & Colorado Springs urban area).

 


 

Pikes Peak Batholith (looking ~ESE) - 1.08 b.y. coarsely-crystalline, porphyritic granites (pgpm2 facies) a little east of the summit house of Pikes Peak.

 


 

View from Pikes Peak summit (looking ~NNE toward the Front Range).

 


 

Pikes Peak Granite (pgpm2 facies) from a little east of the summit house of Pikes Peak.  This facies is coarsely- to very coarsely-crystalline and porphyritic.  It is dominated by K-feldspar, quartz, and biotite mica

 


 

Pikes Peak Granite (pgpf dike facies) (left: 6.0 cm across at its widest; right: 6.1 cm across at its widest) from next to the summit house of Pikes Peak, west of Colorado Springs, western El Paso County, central Colorado, USA (38° 50’ 29” N, 105° 02’ 29” W).  This facies is finely-crystalline, porphyritic, and reported to be fluoritic.

 


 

Pikes Peak Granite (pgpm2 facies) (12.0 cm across) from a little east of the summit house of Pikes Peak.  This facies is coarsely- to very coarsely-crystalline and porphyritic.  It is dominated by K-feldspar, quartz, and biotite mica.

 


 

Pikes Peak Granite (pgmc facies) (10.5 cm across) from the parking lot for the Pikes Peak Cog Railway on the western side of the town of Manitou Springs, eastern base of Pikes Peak, western El Paso County, central Colorado, USA (38° 51’ 20” N, 104° 55’ 58” W).  This facies is coarsely-crystalline and porphyritic.  It is dominated by K-feldspar, quartz, and some biotite mica.

 


 

Reference cited:

 

Hutchinson, R.M.  1987.  Granite-tectonics of the Pikes Peak intrusive center of Pikes Peak composite batholith, Colorado.  Geological Society of America Centennial Field Guide 2: 331-334.

 


 

 

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